You’re transitioning. Your body is equipped to process a high intake of carbs and a lower intake of fat. Your body needs to create enzymes to be able to do this. In the transitional period, the brain may run low on energy which can lead to grogginess, nausea, and headaches. If you’re having a large problem with this, you can choose to reduce carb intake gradually.
People can’t stop talking about the ketogenic diet, and social media is filled with photos and posts from people who credit this high-fat, low-carb plan for their significant weight loss. If you're interested in giving keto a try, consult your doctor first—and then test it out by swapping your usual go-to snack for a keto version. These blogger- and nutritionist-inspired snack recipes are the ones we’ve been seeing all over Pinterest.
You’ve probably heard about the low carb, high fat diet that’s so popular among actors and models, and with good reason: low carb diets offer proper nourishment with whole foods, while keeping your body burning fat for fuel. This is a great way to be, as it makes fat loss largely effortless! But where does this “ketogenic” word fit into the picture?
In the worst form of diabetes (type 1), a condition called ketoacidosis can exist. This is completely different from ketosis. Ketoacidosis is a disease state where there is no more insulin and acids build up to high levels that are dangerous to one's health. But with ketosis, the pH in the body doesn't even get close to the high levels seen with ketoacidosis.
There are numerous benefits that come with being on keto: from weight loss and increased energy levels to therapeutic medical applications. Most anyone can safely benefit from eating a low-carb, high-fat diet. Below, you’ll find a short list of the benefits you can receive from a ketogenic diet. For a more comprehensive list, you can also read our in-depth article here >
×