If you haven't heard of biltong, they're those thick, flavorful strips of air-dried meat that put stringy, chewy, and additive-packed beef jerky to shame. These peppery little slabs are made from grass-fed beef, air-dried for 14 days, and spiced with a blend of cayenne and chili powder to add some heat without overwhelming your palate. They’re also sugar-free, full of protein, and super simple to toss in your bag.

Chocolate and avocados are a strangely fantastic combination. Adding avocado to dessert-type recipes gives them a smooth, silky texture without a pronounced flavor. That’s certainly the case with this pudding, which is crazy easy to make. Just add cocoa powder, avocado, stevia, vanilla extract and salt to a bowl and mix. Easy? Yes. Tasty? Also yes.


Fiber isn't just good for keeping your gut moving — scientists feeding diets rich in fiber to mice are discovering that the carbs, which can't be absorbed by the body, can help protect aging brains from some of the damaging chemicals associated with Alzheimer's and reduce inflammation in the gut. They're confident that the health benefits of eating more fiber extend to humans too.

Note that the U.S. Department of Agriculture advises against cooking frozen chicken in a slow cooker or crock pot because slow cookers cook at a low temperature and may not heat chicken up to 165F, which is the minimum temperature to destroy any dangerous bacteria and ensure that chicken is fully cooked. So if you’re using a crock pot or slow cooker to make Crack Chicken, make sure to defrost it first!
When you eat foods high in carbohydrates and fat, your body naturally produces glucose. Carbohydrates are the easiest thing for the body to process, and therefore it will use them first – resulting in the excess fats to be stored immediately. In turn, this causes weight gain and health problems that are associated with high fat, high carbohydrate diets (NOT keto).
As for branched-chain amino acids, you'll find smart people who swear that they're keto-friendly, and others who don't. One of the BCAAs, valine, can be glucogenic, meaning that it can lead to glucose production and potentially contribute to leaving ketosis behind.[1] But does that mean it will happen? Not necessarily, particularly if you're just an occasional supplement user.
When you eat a ketogenic diet, you switch your body’s fuel source to fat rather than the body’s usual source, glucose (1). From this fuel source switch, the hunger hormone, Ghrelin, is reduced which causes your appetite to decrease (1). Because of the reduction in appetite, it is easier to adopt an intermittent fasting approach or an approach that lessons unwanted eating behavior outside your desired hours (AKA curbs the late night munchies). Therefore, I recommend eating 4 bigger meals rather than 6 small meals on a Ketogenic Meal Plan.
I have been eating this way (very low carb, high fat, protein in between) for around 3 years now. I have found that for me I can MAINTAIN quite easily at an ideal weight and eating to satiety, but in order to actually LOSE weight, I have to at least have a very small calorie deficit. And though the change is gradual, it is sustainable and quite immediate (just little by little). The amount of that calorie deficit required in order to drop excess varies a lot from one individual to the next though, I think. I am particularly intolerant to hunger, and so I cannot overly emphasize how small of a deficit I will allow for. The nice thing about that though is that the hunger is far more pleasant in the absence of carbs.
For a snack that needs zero preparation, reach for the olive jar, Griffin suggests. Olives are mostly made up of fat, specifically healthy monounsaturated fat, Berkley Wellness points out. Plus, as research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry notes, they're loaded with antioxidants, and are low in calories and carbs. Keep in mind that olives can contain a lot of sodium, though — sometimes as much as 42 milligrams in one olive, according to Berkley Wellness.
There are three kinds of ketones, and the urine is only tested for acetoacetate. As you switch to the more efficient fat-burning process, you convert that acetoacetate to beta-hydroxybutyrate. So, yes, your test can show negative or zero ketones. Look at other factors. Are you losing weight? Are you feeling good? If you’re doing 20 grams net carbs a day or less, you’re going to be in ketosis, no matter what.
In the first week, many people report headaches, mental fogginess, dizziness, and aggravation. Most of the time, this is the result of your electrolytes being flushed out, as ketosis has a diuretic effect. Make sure you drink plenty of water and keep your sodium intake up.6One of the fathers of keto, Dr. Phinney, shows that electrolyte levels (especially sodium) can become unbalanced with low carb intake.
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