The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if there is little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Almost half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] There is some evidence that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] The most common adverse effect is constipation, affecting about 30% of patients—this was due to fluid restriction, which was once a feature of the diet, but this led to increased risk of kidney stones and is no longer considered beneficial.[2][3]

But even if you’re not trying to lose weight, the keto meal plans might appeal to you. By limiting sugars and processed grains, you lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. Eating an array of heart-healthy fats, like nuts, olive oil and fish, can decrease your risk of heart disease. And while some people stick to a super strict keto diet, with 75 percent of their diet coming from fat, 20 percent from protein and just five from carbs, even a less intense, modified version can help you reap the keto diet’s benefits.
The more likely result of a ketogenic diet plan, once you've adapted to it, is that you will feel much better and be much healthier. One of the long list of health benefits of a ketogenic diet is that it lowers your fasting blood sugar and insulin levels, helps reverse insulin resistant conditions such as type 2 diabetes, PCOS, fatty liver and Metabolic Syndrome, cools inflammation and in turn, leads to better overall health.
The ketogenic diet—also known as "keto"—has become the latest big thing in weight-loss plans, touted recently by celebs like Jenna Jameson, Mama June, and Halle Berry. The diet involves cutting way back on carbohydrates, to 50 grams a day or less, to help the body achieve a state of ketosis, in which it has to burn fat (rather than sugar) for energy.
A lot of conflicting information has been circulated about the consumption of fat. People are sometimes concerned that adding fat to their diet will cause them to gain weight. This is not necessarily the case. Fat a neutral food. It is also satisfying. If you eat a low-fat meal, whether you have carbs or not, you will stay hungry. Fat allows you to feel full for longer. Furthermore, fat does not spike insulin and adding some healthy fat at meals will help you go longer between meals and really dip down into your fat stores to burn that fat off the body. Burning all that fat off the body is much healthier than holding onto it—which will lead to insulin resistance, diabetes, and all the dominoes that fall after that—cardiovascular disease, cancer, the list goes on and on.
When you lose weight, fat cells shrink. In a fat cell, there are triglycerides and cholesterol. Now, as that fat cell shrinks, you can burn triglycerides, but you cannot burn cholesterol. So it will go into the blood, go to the liver, and come out through the bile. But you’ll be totally fine as long as your triglycerides are low. (If you’re not using those as fuel, then you’re eating too much sugar.)
A: The most common ways to track your carbs is through MyFitnessPal and their mobile app. You cannot track net carbs on the app, although you can track your total carb intake and your total fiber intake. To get your net carbs, just subtract your total fiber intake from your total carb intake. I have written an article on How to Track Carbs on MyFitnessPal.
In regimented keto diets, only 10% of total calories per day (about a measly 20 grams!) come from carbs, 20% from protein, and a whopping 70% from fats. Since our bodies preferentially use carbs for energy, cutting them means we have to use something else to keep organs functioning. Our bodies then turn to the glucose stored in our muscles as glycogen for fuel.

It is possible to combine the results of several small studies to produce evidence that is stronger than that available from each study alone—a statistical method known as meta-analysis. One of four such analyses, conducted in 2006, looked at 19 studies on a total of 1,084 patients.[22] It concluded that a third achieved an excellent reduction in seizure frequency and half the patients achieved a good reduction.[3]


I LOVE Urban Remedy, but as another review said, this plan is my least favorite and I will not order again. First of all, the stevia in the drinks makes me super bloated and they just taste sickly sweet and like stevia. I feel like a cleanse should train your palate away from sweetness. In addition, the meals are just too repetitive, and I found the salmon and chicken to be very bland and unappetizing. Could this not be more varied? Maybe some sardines, tuna? Finally, through NO fault of Urban Remedy, this plan made me realize I had an egg allergy.
Wilder's colleague, paediatrician Mynie Gustav Peterman, later formulated the classic diet, with a ratio of one gram of protein per kilogram of body weight in children, 10–15 g of carbohydrate per day, and the remainder of calories from fat. Peterman's work in the 1920s established the techniques for induction and maintenance of the diet. Peterman documented positive effects (improved alertness, behaviour and sleep) and adverse effects (nausea and vomiting due to excess ketosis). The diet proved to be very successful in children: Peterman reported in 1925 that 95% of 37 young patients had improved seizure control on the diet and 60% became seizure-free. By 1930, the diet had also been studied in 100 teenagers and adults. Clifford Joseph Barborka, Sr., also from the Mayo Clinic, reported that 56% of those older patients improved on the diet and 12% became seizure-free. Although the adult results are similar to modern studies of children, they did not compare as well to contemporary studies. Barborka concluded that adults were least likely to benefit from the diet, and the use of the ketogenic diet in adults was not studied again until 1999.[10][14]
Ketogenic diets often create a significant loss of water during the first phases. This is because carbs are converted to glycogen in your body, which is stored in water within the muscles and liver. As you deplete stored glycogen, your body flushes this water out. This is a huge part of the initial weight loss during the first few weeks of ketosis. While rapid fat loss does occur at first, a lot of water weight is often dropped as well, but this is a great encouragement as it often results in both weight loss and less bloating, allowing clothes to fit better.
Bulletproof Coffee is coffee with added grass-fed butter and a fat called MCT oil, which is extracted from coconut oil. It’s alright to consider it as a meal but remember that it can slightly trigger insulin. However, I think it is good to do in the beginning, as it reduces hunger. For some people, it could slow progress so it’s good to experiment.
Hi Barb, That can definitely be it. Losing when you are close to goal can be more difficult. It could also be that your body’s healthy weight is a little higher than what you’d like – which doesn’t mean you can’t lose, but makes it more difficult. If just eating Keto foods isn’t working, double check the macros for your weight and see if the amount you’re eating needs to be adjusted. You’ll find more help and support in our support group here.
A lot of people take their macros as a “set in stone” type of thing. You shouldn’t worry about hitting the mark every single day to the dot. If you’re a few calories over some days, a few calories under on others – it’s fine. Everything will even itself out in the end. It’s all about a long term plan that can work for you, and not the other way around.
The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if there is little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Almost half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] There is some evidence that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] The most common adverse effect is constipation, affecting about 30% of patients—this was due to fluid restriction, which was once a feature of the diet, but this led to increased risk of kidney stones and is no longer considered beneficial.[2][3]
When you consume lots of sugar and have higher levels of insulin on a continuing basis, your cells try to protect you and eventually start resisting or ignoring insulin. Remember, insulin is the key that allows glucose into the cell. So, your cells prevent insulin from working in order to prevent excessive sugar in the cell. This is your body saying, “If you’re going to keep eating sugar, I will block it at the cellular level.”
We seem to have breakfast, lunch and dinners figured out. But what about snacks? What about those moments where you’re sitting at your desk, or watching a movie, and your normal snacking is out the window with these low-carb dieting? Thankfully, Keto snacks are some of the best Keto-specific recipes out there. You’ll not only squash your cravings, but you’ll also be refueling with healthy fat snacks that will keep you going until dinner.
Coconut MCT oil, cacao butter, grass-fed whey protein, organic almond butter, and other keto-approved ingredients combine for this protein bomb of an energy bar, designed specifically to support ketone production and keep you fit and focused for hours. It’s basically like jumper cables for your metabolism… if jumper cables tasted like smooth chocolate and almonds.
if you are not eating organic or wild red and other meats and also ensuring they’ve not been vaccinated with “the usual” poisons that is so ‘mainstream’ now and putting all of humanity at risk, you’re putting yourself and even your offspring at huge risk! Any benefit you may want to derive from following a ketogenic or any diet is pointless in light of what science has known and proven over 20 years ago and which mainstream health care professionals and providers are, respectfully, ignorant of (that’s what they’ve been led to believe by those invested in pharma and their regulatory bodies). If you don’t believe me, watch “The Truth About Vaccines” with an open mind. You won’t regret it. (I have absolutely no investment in nor connection to the producers of that docu~series, I have simply had my “mind blown” by the facts … I’ve been a holistic health practitioner and student for over 40 years so I’m not “convinced” easily.
Keto bombs are snacks that ketogenic dieters love because they’re healthy, delicious cheat foods that are high in fat, but virtually devoid of carbs and protein. I have a lot of videos on how to make keto bombs, but you don't have to have them with each meal. The goals would be to have one a day. Dumping a lot of butter or coconut oil into your coffee may not work for you. Some people can digest it, and some people can't.

A ketogenic diet focuses on minimal plant-based carbs, moderate amounts of clean protein, and high healthy fat consumption – the three keys to achieving nutritional ketosis. In ketosis, you’re essentially converting yourself from a “sugar burner” to a “fat burner.” With 40g or less net carbs per day, you’ll feel satisfied instead of hungry. The lower sugar helps reduce inflammation and fight chronic disease while keeping your insulin levels in tact, too. Great for people suffering from chronic conditions or anyone who wants to feel their best.
Ready to head out the door and start buying groceries? Slow down there, chief. Go through the pantry, fridge, freezer, and secret stashes under the bed, and get rid of foods with any significant carb content. In the first few days, you could end up craving them—badly. This means fruit, too. Even carrots and onions are too high-glycemic to work with keto, Wittrock says.
While healthy fats are a keto mainstay, they're not the only thing you need: "It's important to make sure you're getting plenty of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients when observing the keto diet," Sugiuchi explains. Seaweed snacks, she says, are a salty and crunchy way to score some extra nutrients and can satisfy any crunchy/salty/carby cravings.
However, ALSO be aware that most doctors get very little training on nutrition and don't understand the general effect of foods on the body. They are also taught that ketosis is dangerous, and so they know even less about ketogenic diets. Hence, if you ask your physician about this diet, you may get push back and a scary "ketosis-is-dangerous" sermon.

If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.
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