Physicians of ancient Greece treated diseases, including epilepsy, by altering their patients' diet. An early treatise in the Hippocratic Corpus, On the Sacred Disease, covers the disease; it dates from c. 400 BC. Its author argued against the prevailing view that epilepsy was supernatural in origin and cure, and proposed that dietary therapy had a rational and physical basis.[Note 3] In the same collection, the author of Epidemics describes the case of a man whose epilepsy is cured as quickly as it had appeared, through complete abstinence of food and drink.[Note 4] The royal physician Erasistratus declared, "One inclining to epilepsy should be made to fast without mercy and be put on short rations."[Note 5] Galen believed an "attenuating diet"[Note 6] might afford a cure in mild cases and be helpful in others.[11]
There are three kinds of ketones, and the urine is only tested for acetoacetate. As you switch to the more efficient fat-burning process, you convert that acetoacetate to beta-hydroxybutyrate. So, yes, your test can show negative or zero ketones. Look at other factors. Are you losing weight? Are you feeling good? If you’re doing 20 grams net carbs a day or less, you’re going to be in ketosis, no matter what.
People also see good weight loss results on the keto diet because eating a low carb, high fat diet can help you feel less hungry and not have to count calories or portion sizes to lose weight. Plus, cutting out the refined carbs and sugars normally present in a traditional Western diet helps avoid crazy spikes in blood sugar that can lead to the feeling of being hungry again soon after eating.
Protein is the other type that can also prevent you from getting into ketosis IF it’s too high. It is generally recommended that you keep your protein intake between 3-6 ounces per meal. High-protein diets, as in the Atkins Diet, can keep you from getting into ketosis. This is because your liver can only process a certain amount of protein. Anything more than around 30 grams per meal will then be converted into glucose (sugar).  So, ketosis is NOT a high protein diet. It is a moderate protein diet. We need some protein for supporting our structural body parts and their replacement. This includes muscle, joints, hair, nails, skin, and organs.
hi I have been following this diet have not had any sugar and I just want to know how am I going over the carbs I’m eating vegetables which I know are carbs but I’m not overdoing it. What is the best way to keep up with your carbs fats and proteins also do I need a scale? I feel like I lost weight this week but most of it was probably water weight I was in ketosis on Thursday and today it shows I’m not. Any help would be greatly appreciated
Lisa, Yes, it is safe to put cream cheese in the pressure cooker, this is how we always make it. Alternatively, you can add the cream cheese once the chicken is cooked and you take it out of the pot to shred it, but you’ll need to leave the pot on “saute” and cook (stirring frequently) until the cream cheese mixture is melted into the sauce. (You may also need to add a splash more liquid if done this way.) If you try it this way, let us know how it goes!
A short-lived increase in seizure frequency may occur during illness or if ketone levels fluctuate. The diet may be modified if seizure frequency remains high, or the child is losing weight.[18] Loss of seizure-control may come from unexpected sources. Even "sugar-free" food can contain carbohydrates such as maltodextrin, sorbitol, starch and fructose. The sorbitol content of suntan lotion and other skincare products may be high enough for some to be absorbed through the skin and thus negate ketosis.[30]
Not only is this jerky zero-carb, sugar-free, and full of protein, but Davidson says it's the perfect keto post-workout recovery snack, especially since protein is crucial in building and repairing muscles after exercise. (P.S. This is what you need to know about exercising on the keto diet.) And since jerky is harder to eat and chew, it allows time for your stomach to tell your brain you're full, keeping those pesky carb cravings at bay, she says.

Ketosis takes some time to get into – about two weeks of low carb eating is required for the initial adaptation. During this time there will be bouts of sluggishness, fatigue, headaches, and some gastrointestinal issues as you adapt, often referred to as “keto flu“. Proper electrolyte intake will correct most of these issues. In addition, the “diet” aspect of this ketogenic diet plan – that is, the caloric restriction – shouldn’t be worried about. Weight loss will come as your body regulates appetite as it the addiction to sugar and processed food lessens, so restricting calories during the initial two weeks isn’t recommended.
You’re transitioning. Your body is equipped to process a high intake of carbs and a lower intake of fat. Your body needs to create enzymes to be able to do this. In the transitional period, the brain may run low on energy which can lead to grogginess, nausea, and headaches. If you’re having a large problem with this, you can choose to reduce carb intake gradually.
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