A lot of conflicting information has been circulated about the consumption of fat. People are sometimes concerned that adding fat to their diets will cause them to gain weight. This is not necessarily the case. Fat is a neutral food when it comes to insulin. It is also satisfying. Fat makes you feel full longer to help with intermittent fasting (IF).
I get asked this question a lot. Generally speaking, the answer is no. As long as you avoid vegetables like corn, beets, and carrots, which are high in starch and sugar, especially carrot JUICE, which is packed with sugar, for example, you don't have to worry about the vegetable family. In fact, you want to eat lots of green leafy vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, Brussel sprouts—make big kale salads with bacon bits and a full fat dressing. Or make a big beet green sauté in coconut oil with some bacon, garlic, and onion stirred in. These will be dishes PACKED with potassium which will quiet food cravings much like fat does. Often, food cravings are nothing more than your body crying out for NUTRIENTS and MINERALS you’re not giving it. Your body doesn’t really want chips and sugar—it wants more potassium, magnesium, vitamin A, K2, and B vitamins.
Sarah, To make this recipe using the ranch packet, I would do the following: 1) Omit the following: apple cider vinegar, chives, garlic powder, onion powder, red pepper flakes, dill, salt, and black pepper. 2) Use 2 ranch packets. 3) Increase the water to 1 to 1 1/2 cups (because the ranch packets are likely to contain thickeners). If you make the recipe with these changes, please let us know how it goes!
Karen, We haven’t tried this recipe using the Ranch packets, but yes, it should work fine! To do so, we would omit the following: vinegar, chives, garlic powder, onion powder, crushed red pepper flakes, dill, salt, and black pepper, and add 2 (1 oz) packets of dry Ranch seasoning. Yes, it would probably be delicious served over white rice. If you try this recipe using the Ranch packets, please let us know how it goes!
A keto diet has shown to improve triglyceride levels and cholesterol levels most associated with arterial buildup. More specifically low-carb, high-fat diets show a dramatic increase in HDL and decrease in LDL particle concentration compared to low-fat diets.3A study in the long-term effects of a ketogenic diet shows a significant reduction in cholesterol levels, body weight, and blood glucose. Read more on keto and cholesterol >
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