We don’t use prepackaged foods in the meal plans, so you do have to cook, but I’m all about convenience and saving time! And, the plans are designed for that. You’ll re-purpose leftovers and meal prep for lunch, so you don’t have to make your lunch from scratch on a daily basis. Dinner will be a fast, easy recipe each night, with one night for either going out or leftovers. For breakfast you’ll have the option of making a meal prep recipe, drinking coffee or fasting, because we’re split on that in the low carb and keto community.
Following the ketogenic diet can be safe in the short term but it does come with health concerns. 'It's not something that I recommend for the general population for the long-term,' says Dr Barclay. 'By drastically cutting out carbohydrate-containing foods, you'll miss out on the nutritional benefits of healthy choices like whole grains, fruit, starchy vegetables, and legumes such as beans, chickpeas and lentils.'
While healthy fats are a keto mainstay, they're not the only thing you need: "It's important to make sure you're getting plenty of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients when observing the keto diet," Sugiuchi explains. Seaweed snacks, she says, are a salty and crunchy way to score some extra nutrients and can satisfy any crunchy/salty/carby cravings.
For the purpose of this keto meal plan, you will be making food for Monday morning through Sunday night.  This should provide a full, 7 day comprehensive meal plan for you to follow. On Sunday you will make breakfast and lunch for the 5 day work week as well as the first dinner.  Then mid week you will make a second dinner.  The weekend is more of a free for all with less set parameters. This is the time to experiment and try new things. I am going under the assumption that you have more time to cook and prepare on the weekend and also that you might have leftover food from the week.  If your weekends are totally slammed, consider just premaking all 7 days of food by tweaking the quantities in the recipes.
Well, ketogenic comes from the word “ketosis“, which is a state in which your body breaks down fat molecules into ketones to provide energy. This state is achieved through very low carbohydrate intake and higher than normal fat intake. The “normal” state of the body’s metabolism is called “glycolysis”, where carbs are burnt for energy. The long and short is that when your body is in carb-burning mode, it will use all available carbs for energy before it touches stored fat. In ketosis, your body is primed to burn fat, and this is great news for anyone trying to get trim and slim.
Eggs are a standout snack because they have one of the lowest energy-to-nutrient-density ratios of any food, as is noted in an article published in August 2016 in the journal Proceedings of the Nutrition Society. They’re rich in good fats (so long as you don’t skip the yolk!) and a solid source of high-quality protein: Each egg has 5 grams (g) of fat, 6 g of protein, and 0 g of carbohydrates, according to the Egg Nutrition Center. Plus, they’re inexpensive — about 20 cents per egg, the center says. Keep several hard-boiled eggs in your fridge, so you can easily grab one when you’re in need of a nutritious snack.
This green yet under-utilized vegetable is highly nutrient dense. It would have only 25 calories while giving you 77% of the daily allowance of vitamin C and high levels of vitamin K, vitamin B 1, vitamin B 2 and B 6. It also rich in  omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, choline, biotin, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, niacin, pantothenic acid and protein. 
When you eat tons of carbs, your blood sugar is consistently elevated, and then so is insulin. Insulin is a hormone that keeps your blood sugar in check by shuttling the glucose into cells, but when there’s a consistently high amount of insulin, your cells become resistant. This insulin resistance makes it easier to store fat, and chronically high levels of insulin also cause excessive inflammation in the body, which contributes to heart disease, high blood pressure, and potentially type 2 diabetes.
Janie, We haven’t made this recipe in the oven, but yes, we think it would work well! Here’s how we would do it: 1) crisp the bacon on the stovetop; 2) for step 2 in the recipe above, add all ingredients to a 9 by 13-inch casserole dish, cover it with foil, and bake it at 350F until the chicken is fully cooked, about 30 to 45 minutes (the chicken should not be pink in the center, and it should shred easily with a fork); 3) remove and shred the chicken; 4) stir the shredded chicken into the creamy sauce along with the cheddar cheese; 5) top with bacon and scallion and serve. If you give it a try, please let us know how it goes!
Achieving ketosis is a pretty straightforward, but it can seem complicated and confusing with all of the information out there.4If you want to learn more about ketosis and the scientific process around it, you can visit a very in-depth discussion about on Dr. Peter Attia’s website. Here’s the bottom line on what you need to do, ordered in levels of importance:
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