Ketosis is a state of physical being and energy utilization when the body is running on ketones instead of glucose. Ketones are a clean fuel the body and brain absolutely loves. Ketones are an alternative fuel for the body that is not sugar or glucose. Running on ketones is like running a car on electricity rather than diesel fuel. Ketones are a cleaner fuel source - an alternative fuel source that gives a person way more energy than glucose. Even professional athletes can outrun and outperform any other athlete on ketosis than carb loading. By lowering your insulin, your sugars and refined carbohydrates, way down there close to zero to 5% of your daily calories or lower, you will burn fat as opposed to glucose for diet purposes or because you want to run on this clean fuel that many people find can help them perform better in all areas of life, mentally and physically. When you’re running on glucose and insulin is spiked, you’re not dipping down into your fat stores for energy. You’re burning up your muscles, not fat. When you’re in ketosis, you’re no longer spiking your blood sugar and you begin running on your own fat for fuel, which is idea for losing weight—the right kind of weight—fat.
It usually takes three to four days for your body to go into ketosis because you have to use up your body's stores of glucose, i.e., sugar first, Keatley says. Any major diet change can give you some, uh, issues, and Keatley says he often sees patients who complain of IBS-like symptoms and feeling wiped out at the beginning of the diet. (The tiredness happens because you have less access to carbs, which give you quick energy, he explains.)
It's only when you combine lots of fat and lots of carbohydrates in your diet that you get into trouble. The sugar from the carbohydrates drives up your insulin levels, and those high insulin levels cause the body to mishandle the way fats are metabolized. More fat is stored or circulates in the blood. This causes the metabolic syndrome and weight gain associated with insulin resistance and starts the health problems that should be associated with a high carb diet, not a ketogenic diet plan.
Ketosis takes some time to get into – about two weeks of low carb eating is required for the initial adaptation. During this time there will be bouts of sluggishness, fatigue, headaches, and some gastrointestinal issues as you adapt, often referred to as “keto flu“. Proper electrolyte intake will correct most of these issues. In addition, the “diet” aspect of this ketogenic diet plan – that is, the caloric restriction – shouldn’t be worried about. Weight loss will come as your body regulates appetite as it the addiction to sugar and processed food lessens, so restricting calories during the initial two weeks isn’t recommended.
You've likely heard horror stories of what competitors feel like when they cut carbs low, or when the average bro talks about going keto. However, the odds are that those people were not actually in nutritional ketosis, or more importantly, following a well-formulated ketogenic diet. Yes, you may experience some fogginess and discomfort, but it doesn't have to be intense if you handle it right.
The brain is composed of a network of neurons that transmit signals by propagating nerve impulses. The propagation of this impulse from one neuron to another is typically controlled by neurotransmitters, though there are also electrical pathways between some neurons. Neurotransmitters can inhibit impulse firing (primarily done by γ-aminobutyric acid, or GABA) or they can excite the neuron into firing (primarily done by glutamate). A neuron that releases inhibitory neurotransmitters from its terminals is called an inhibitory neuron, while one that releases excitatory neurotransmitters is an excitatory neuron. When the normal balance between inhibition and excitation is significantly disrupted in all or part of the brain, a seizure can occur. The GABA system is an important target for anticonvulsant drugs, since seizures may be discouraged by increasing GABA synthesis, decreasing its breakdown, or enhancing its effect on neurons.[7]
You’ll quickly find that salads are your friend when in ketosis, and for a good reason: they provide lots of food to fill you up, but they’re not going to bog you down. A bed of spinach with some red onion, bacon, a little tomato, and a hot sauce vinaigrette is quick and delicious. Add in some protein – perhaps that leftover salmon from day 1 – and you’ve got a complete, healthy lunch.

This is based on another principle that I talked about in previous books: You don’t lose weight and get healthy. Rather, you get healthy to lose weight. More than just losing weight or reducing your blood sugar, your goals should be getting healthy, making sure you get as much nutrients as you can from what you eat, and making sure you only eat quality food. I look at ketosis as ONE strategy or piece of the puzzle. Ketosis is healthy because it allows you to run your body on a cleaner fuel.

Deviled eggs get a bad rep because they’re usually made with heaps of commercially made mayonnaise, which is loaded with canola and vegetable oils. Hello, GMOs! These deviled eggs, on the other hand, rely on benefit-rich avocado to get that creamy texture without unnecessary ingredients. With seasonings like cumin and chili powder along with fresh cilantro, you’ll love taking these on the go.
Keto Smoothies and Shakes — Some of our favorite keto smoothies are the Peanut Butter Caramel Milkshake, Blueberry Banana Bread Smoothie, McKeto Strawberry Milkshake, Cucumber Spinach Smoothie, Blackberry Chocolate Shake, and Keto Tropical Smoothie. Feel free to add your favorite low-carb protein powder to your shake or smoothie to help you meet your protein needs and build muscle.
Here are a few of the most common side effects that I come across when people first start keto. Frequently the issues relate to dehydration or lack of micronutrients (vitamins) in the body. Make sure that you’re drinking enough water (close to a gallon a day) and eating foods with good sources of micronutrients. To read more on micronutrients, click here >
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