Most people have probably heard of the Atkins diet, which is a pretty general take on ketogenic eating. Wildly popular in the 70s and again in the 90s, Atkins and the low-carb diet are one of the best ways to lose weight. In fact, one of the biggest benefits to low carb eating is that it is a very efficient way to lose weight without much effort. The combination of filling meals that reduce overeating and the fact that, when you’re in ketosis your body burns stored fat for energy makes this an ideal diet for people whose primary goal is fat loss.
One cup sliced cucumbers and 10 large olives makes for a great keto-friendly snack, with added benefits: “This is a great snack to help people in ketosis supplement their sodium levels." says Desiree Nielsen, R.D., author of Un-Junk Your Diet. When you're in ketosis, your body needs more sodium, and “without adequate sodium, people are at risk for dehydration, constipation, and more dangerous electrolyte imbalances," she adds.
Keep in mind that the doctor is getting nutritional ketosis confused with a much more dangerous condition called ketoacidosis. These are two different conditions.  Ketoacidosis is mostly  a concern for Type 1 diabetics and others whose bodies are unable to make or process insulin correctly. Ketoacidosis usually develops when a person with type 1 diabetes develops an serious infection, has a heart attack or other debilitating illness. It is accompanied by dehydration, high blood sugars and is precipitated by the inability of the sick patient to administer proper amounts of injected insulin.

Although there are many seed-based crackers available on Amazon, Davidson says these flaxseed crackers are a winning keto pick, because they're relatively low in carbs and provide a decent amount of fiber. They're also high in omega-3, a fatty acid that's beneficial for a healthy brain, skin, and heart. Davidson recommends adding some flavor and creaminess by spreading some Laughing Cow Cheese on top.
Ariel Warren is a Registered Dietitian, Diabetes Educator, graduate from Brigham Young, and was diagnosed with Type 1 at the age of 4 years old. Ariel understands diabetes and enjoys working with clients to improve their blood sugar management, healthy eating, weight loss, fitness, and pregnancy. For coaching from a T1D Dietitian, you can contact Ariel directly, through her website: arielwarren.com.
Who says dessert can’t be keto-friendly? This sugar- and sugar alcohol-free treat is made from 100-percent stone-ground South American cocoa beans and sweetened with monk fruit and non-GMO soluble vegetable fiber, making it both low in carbs (just three net grams per ounce) and melt-in-your-mouth creamy. Throw in a handful of earthy, buttery almonds for good measure and you’ve got something that’ll appease your sweet tooth without ruining your diet.

As a result of those satiating fats required by the ketogenic diet, you may find you’re not craving snacks as much as you usually do. “I find people who follow the ketogenic diet, they’re just not as hungry, so their snack frequency comes down,” says Dina Griffin, RDN, with eNRG Performance in Littleton, Colorado. “There’s just so much fat in their diet, so they say, ‘I don’t want to eat again,’ or ‘I can’t, I’m just not hungry.’”

In study after study, survey data from around the world has shown that people who stick to limited amounts of meats, dairy, and processed foods while fueling up on fiber-rich plant-based foods including vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and, yes, even carb-heavy beans have some of the best health outcomes. Seidelmann describes their diets as being rich in "whole foods."
When you eat tons of carbs, your blood sugar is consistently elevated, and then so is insulin. Insulin is a hormone that keeps your blood sugar in check by shuttling the glucose into cells, but when there’s a consistently high amount of insulin, your cells become resistant. This insulin resistance makes it easier to store fat, and chronically high levels of insulin also cause excessive inflammation in the body, which contributes to heart disease, high blood pressure, and potentially type 2 diabetes.
A standard ketogenic diet consists of a split of around 30 per cent protein, 60 per cent fats and 10 per cent carbohydrates. Experts advise that you should eat no more than 50g of net carbs a day for the body to stay in a ketogenic state. 50g of carbs is equivalent to one cup of oats, one medium sweet potato, one cup cooked brown rice or one slice rye bread - in other words, not much.
There are numerous benefits that come with being on keto: from weight loss and increased energy levels to therapeutic medical applications. Most anyone can safely benefit from eating a low-carb, high-fat diet. Below, you’ll find a short list of the benefits you can receive from a ketogenic diet. For a more comprehensive list, you can also read our in-depth article here >
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